Brazilian women rocking in Science

A new study shows that Brazilian women have nearly reached parity with men when it comes to scientific authorship. During the period between 2011 and 2015, 49% of the scholarly scientific articles published by Brazilians were authored by women, according to a massive study on Gender in the Global Research Landscape published by Elsevier. The paper identifies and compares twelve countries – including the United States, the European Union, the United Kingdom and Brazil – by their publications of scientific articles. Brazilian women ranked first.

Social movements linked to the powerful evangelic church have successfully pushed a conservative vision of a woman’s place in Brazil. Politically, women have fallen over behind politically in the last few years in; since Michel Temer´s government, only 53 of the 513 congressional representatives are female. This places Brazil at #115 in a global ranking of female political representation. Apart from that, Brazilian women tend to have a lower scholarly output on average than men; unequal pay remains persistent: a woman’s work hour is worth a fourth less than the man’s.

Despite from being far from complete gender equality, according to Tamara Naiz, President of Brazil’s National Association of Post-Graduates, the success of female Brazilian scientist shows that, even coming from unequal conditions, a woman can develop research that is just as good as that of a man.

The story came out on Forbes.

Celina Turchi is a Brazilian epidemiologist that led a workforce of researchers aiming to correlate Zika virus with microcephaly.

Celina Turchi is a Brazilian epidemiologist that led a workforce of researchers aiming to correlate Zika virus with microcephaly